Do You Want To Be Famous Or Do You Want To Act?

The most important lesson I’ve learned as an artist, a performing artist is:

You must make your own opportunities. An agent negotiates your price, you negotiate your worth. A manager gives you his or her observation of your type, your venues and how you present yourself. Nevertheless, in the final analysis, you and you alone, must be proactive in your own career.

Through the years, I have performed in over fifty stage productions since my early childhood. I am surprised at the advice my well-meaning friends and fellow actors give to me or others. On Yahoo Answers, there are countless questions, from small towns, big cities and villages across the world, asking either 1) How to I become a famous actor/actress; 2) How do I get an agent to become a famous actor/actress in movies; or 3) How do I get acting experience in my small town? Many saying they don’t want to do theatre…only film…or the Twilight films…or work for Disney exclusively. Yes, most very young girls and boys and some; amazingly, high school seniors and early college teens and 20s.

The advice given to these questions is often way off-basefrom just get an agent to pay for this agency [or that agency] and they’ll put you in films. NO! You don’t justget an agent”. Agents are business people and need clients who can book work. Thus, you need experience, lots of experience. Secondly, in my experience, 75% of the time, I booked more work on my own when I didn’t have an agent.

There’s no excuse, no matter where you are, for not finding opportunities to gain experience. Every city, town or village has some sort of place, school or community center that has or is open to entertainment or speakers. I was in a small town in Florida and found a tiny theater in a town that was two blocks long. The Lake Wales Little Theatre does good plays with really good turn-out for audiences. As a teen, on tour, I did a play in a town called Winnemucca, Nevada, where they had a huge, state-of-the-art theater called The Nixon Theatre. The cast of our musical out-numbered the audience. In fact, the whole town came to see the show and we all had Dairy Queen afterwards – the town and the cast!

Of course, it must be incredible to make a good living doing what you love. There have been lean times and more non-lean times with my acting career. Have I found opportunity? Yes, everywhere I go or have been. I’ve made more money as a stage manager – theaters always pay the crew. Actors are the last to be paid. Why? We are a dime a dozen. We all want to be noticed or famous and will work for free or low pay for that opportunity of recognition. Admit it, we all do it!

Do I want to be famous? Not necessarily, yet, if it means I will be paid every time I step on a stage. Then, count me in, “Yes!” What do I really want? To make a living as an actor! I do not seek riches in the millions. I can survive, even in New York, with $50,000 a year. The highest I have seen, in a lifetime of doing what I love [as often as I can], has been $20,000. It was not for acting, though, that was for administrative work. Still, I will not and cannot stop pursuing the dream. I am a Broadway actress/singer without a Broadway show.

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Curry Chronicles: You Must Be His Daughter–Part I

DISCLAIMER: These are my experiences, shared by me, as they happened to me. People in these true event(s), may not remember them in the same way. Certain facts can be agreed upon by all parties, nevertheless. I met Tim Curry, in New York, on August 28, 1987. Beyond that, I do not, in any way, suggest, hold or express that anyone else experienced this event in any paranormal, psychic or unusual way. That is how my experience of the event(s) happened, though.

YOU MUST BE HIS DAUGHTER

By Angela Theresa Egic

 It was getting very near the time I would finally meet the man!

 I saw signs where everywhere. Many were almost too literal.

Everywhere I went I could feel Tim near me, around me. I would ‘just know’ he was in New York.

A day or two later, I’d read in the gossip column that Tim Curry was seen in New York, on the very day I thought he was nearby!

This feeling of knowing Tim was nearby began when Clue was released. I had missed TC by one day. I went to the theater the day before the movie opened to the public; they had the premiere (for the actors) the day before that, nevertheless.

I was getting closer to meeting the man, though, admittedly.

My life was about to be forever changed, though:

A little overview:

On September 28, 1984I turned 21-years-old. I had barely survived anorexia, had a boyfriend away in college in somewhere near Flagstaff, AZ; was living with Mom & Dad in Phoenix, AZ. Before the anorexia got the best of me, I had applied for and auditioned for NY’s American Academy of Dramatic Arts. The audition was held right there in Phoenix.

October 4, 1984: I took my first airplane ride and arrived in New York City, for the first time in my life. Had a job at Macy’s in three days and began school at AADA.

In about 1985: I left AADA and moved to Brooklyn with my friend, Betsy.

One day, I called home to Phoenix. My father answered the phone. He was not the most observant or demonstrative man.

I said, “Hey Dad, remember me?”

My father grumbled, as usual, “Of course, Little One [he always called me this]!”

Absent-mindedly, I replied, “So, no one is home?”

My father, a man of 71-years-old [17 years my mother’s senior], was not terribly reliable about taking messages. Thus, if he was there and answered the phone, he’d surely forget I had called by the time Mom returned from her errands.

Dad, rather defensively, told me, “I’m home, I’m somebody!”

Laughing, “Oh, I know, Daddy. I didn’t mean it that way.”

Then he really shocked me, “You know, I saw that actor you like on television. Is he British? Tim …something?”

I was pleasantly surprised that my rather aloof father would even notice my obsessions, especially from three thousand miles away!

Excited and happy, I asked him, “You mean, Tim Curry?”

Yes, he was on TV. I like him! Have you met him yet?”

I told Daddy that I hadn’t, but hoped to someday. Dad gave me his blessing. That was a lot for my father and made me happy.

Late 1986: My father had cancer surgery, went into a coma and was declared dead. My mother and I, after five neurosurgeons reported he was brain-dead, opted to turn off life support.

My father breathed on his own for three months, then passed away, in Arizona, on February 4, 1987. The same day Liberace passed on. My father’s spirit came to me, all the way in NY, the night he passed and he told me goodbye.

Right before my father passed, my Uncle Curly, Mom’s brother, [the uncle that Tim Curry resembled in Clue. Yikes!], passed away. After my father, my Mom’s sister, Aunt Mary Margaret, passed on. My poor mother lost her brother, her husband and her sister all within a few months of each other. Rough year.

In New York, my Rocky Horror Picture Show midnight friends/cast and I were still going strong, doing our shadowcast show in Brooklyn each Saturday. We called ourselves The Low Down Cheap Little Punks. I played Frank N. Furter and getting great reviews.

Our friend in the cast, Susie “Squeaky” Schwartzberg, 19-years-old, was, like my father, battling cancera malignant tumor under her eye.

While I sought my meeting with TC, Susie and her family were trying to contact her obsession; Christopher “Superman” Reeves. [This was before his tragic accident.]

I had seen a psychic at a psychic fair (duh) and the minute I brought up TC– she said “Yes, you will see him soon!”

I didn’t even tell her his last name. When I did tell her — she had never heard of him!

As the reading went on, she said I’d meet him at a place with the initials MM – my first thought was the Mid-Manhattan Library. I worked near it and Tim is known for his keen interest in literature.

I, naturally, spent a lot more time at the Mid-Manhattan Library. I spent some time there, anyway, as I love books, too.

In the meantime, I listened in my head and my body for that vibration that let me know, rather accurately, when TC was nearby.

The psychic also said, “TC is just a breath away, just turn around and he will be there.”

I was walking my regular route home from work, towards Times Square, and my usual hang-out, The Marriott Marquis. Wait one minute! Hitting me, like a ton of bricks. I hung out at the Marriott Marquis, a lotthat has the initials MM!

I became aware of TC being nearby, just then, and rememberedjust a breath away, turn around and he will be there.”

At a ‘Don’t Walk’ signal, I turned around slowly.

There! In bright red letters:

CURRY IN A HURRY

When did that restaurant get there? I walk here every day and have never seen this restaurant, and there it was!

Nearly out loud, I talked to TC telepathically, “Very funny! If I am going to meet you, tell me when, please!”

The numbers 23 and 24 came into my head. This was June or July 1987.

I almost instantly understood: I will meet TC while I am still 23-years-old and nearly 24.

My 24th birthday was coming up, too, September 28th, 1987.

At the Times Square area, I was passing 1515 Broadway on the corner of 44th, a block before the Marriott Marquis [the Broadway show Me & My Girl was playing at the Marriott Marquis Theater].

Inside the big glass windows of 1515 Broadway, you can see the escalators to what I believed to be a movie theater.

I was still feeling TC in the area and wanted to test my intuition, see if I could actually track him down this time! As I stepped in front of those glass doors this very overwhelming thought to go up the stairs made me stop and stare at the plate-glass doors of 1515 Broadway.

I argued, in my silent voice, with this thought. I figured it was from TC. “But, Tim, I don’t want to go to a movie!”

The thought was even stronger, almost pulling me to the entrance turnstile doors. The number three (3) invaded my thoughts as well – theater number three? After about twenty minutes, I forced myself to walk away and go home, without ever following my gut feeling to enter 1515 Broadway and head to Theater 3.

At home, my TC picture fell off my desk.  I cried out, “I just need to meet him!”

I talked to my father, my God and TC in my prayers. I asked God and Daddy to help me meet Tim. And I asked Tim, since I didn’t understand these signs, to show me, in my dreams, where he is exactly!

I cried myself to sleep with these thoughts and prayers — to meet the only person I had ever felt such an intense spiritual connection to. I no longer believed it was just attraction.

TC reminded me of something deep in my soul . . . a soul mate, yes, but more than that! A long-lost love, friend, brother, father, a voice in my very soul, a guide, a comfort and the spirit which accompanied me through lifetime after lifetime in so many ways. Crazy maybe, certainly it couldn’t hurt to meet him, to befriend him or to date him.

Day One Hundred Three (103): My Boys & The Theatre

Day One-Hundred Three (103): Friday, June 11th, 2010

103) Your Inner World Can Be Made A Reality

Hildegard of Bingen perhaps exemplified the Law of Attraction’s age-old idea that “as you think, so you become.” Some might say that Hildegard’s prodigious works during her lifetime sprang from an inner world in which her thoughts, observations, reflections, and mystical revelation found fecund ground. Her desire to serve the Lord meant following the instructions of a heavenly voice telling her to reveal her knowledge even though her fear of condemnation literally made her ill. Nevertheless, Hildegard worked in tune with her calling and perception of truth — all in alignment with deeply held spiritual beliefs, and the Law of Attraction ensured that her inner contemplative process bore even more fruit. Her desire to serve the Lord meant expressing the knowledge she was being given.

http://www.visionariestolight.com/meera.htm

From the book: 365 Ways To Live The Law of Attraction by Meera Lester

Tonight it was just me and the boys, rehearsing at the theatre.

It is a such a pleasure working with Mauricio and Charles — both of them very dedicated and hard-working young men; good actors and just good dispositions. I took some rehearsal photographs tonight so we could make some advertisements, too.

For the first time, Mauricio was able to see our little stage (which is really a floor space) at Manhattan Theatre Source.

Upon viewing its limits — we’re not sure the blocking will work perfectly. Nevertheless, I think it will be good.

My daughter from another mother, Lauren Arneson [and one of the best Stage Managers this side of the Rio Grande] was there, preparing tech for something (?).

Lauren loved Mauricio and watching us do the American Sign Language! We taught her how to say “nice to meet you” and she can’t wait to see the show!

 

Love, Light & Laughter,

Angela Theresa

 

 

Day One-Hundred Twenty-Nine (129): Playwrighting Wednesday

Day OneHundred Twenty-Nine (129): Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

129) Remember That Prosperity Is For Everyone

Attracting wealth into your life does not mean that you are depleting someone else’s reserve. Law of Attraction teachers and practitioners say that the power that brings something to you out of infinite potential can deliver the same thing to another. There is no corresponding loss to infinite potential. When you give from a place of loving kindness, your gift, some say, returns magnified many times over and sometimes in a different form.

Not too long ago, at Manhattan Theatre Source, we began a Wednesday evening Source Writers Group, for those who couldn’t come on Sunday afternoon. Tonight, for the first time, I attended this meeting. My back really killing me and I was hyped up on Tylenol 3.

In the group, Ed Malin read a piece he wrote, it was interesting . . .with flying and ships and San Francisco. As different as it was, it was entertaining and so visual, at least, in my “movie-like” mind.

That said, Christine met me there. Mozz Mendez, gotta love him, wanted us to see his show, Billy Carver And The Children In Mind. He says it’s his last stage play and he will focus on tv writing for a while.

Mozz is right, though, there’s more money in television or film writing.

Christine and I did our usual session and went to hang out and talk at the diner.

Whatever the case, the pain is very bad…my diagnosis is lumbar strain. What the hell did I do?! Not moving very quickly, or well.

Love, Light & Laughter,

Angela Theresa