Day Sixty-Three (63): GOOD CLEAN FUN by Sherry Goldberg

Day SixtyThree (63): Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

63) Andrew Carnegie Knew The Secret

Napoleon Hill interviewed five hundred of the wealthiest men of his lifetime. Born into a poor Virginian family in 1883 and orphaned by the age of twelve, Hill overcame poverty to become a journalist and lawyer. Scotsman and steel titan Andrew Carnegie became his mentor. Carnegie felt that others, if they understood his formula for building a stupendous fortune, could likewise create wealth. He urged Hill to interview successful American businessmen like him to find out their success secrets. Hill did and subsequently shared his findings in books, lectures, and speeches.

After a bit of work and talking Manhattan Theatre Source into a special price, Friday night . . . for lots and lots of copies. I collected a cast of good actors to do a reading of the play, GOOD CLEAN FUN by my friend, Sherry Goldberg.

The history of this funny play, for me, goes like this:

In 1990/1991, I was back in Arizona from my first stint in New York (1984-1989). I was doing lots of theatre work in Phoenix and surrounding areas. At one point, I ended up being invited to a party at someone’s apartment out near Cave Creek, AZ. A theatre party.

At this party, I was being my usual self: vibrant, funny, outspoken and as some call it, a bit crazy. I was talking to a hot older guy … older to me, at least. I was in my late 20s at the time and this guy was in his 40s. The person who invited me to this party, from what I recall, was a woman named Heather Brody.

I had been acquainted with Heather since she was a small child in Centerstage at the Phoenix Jewish Community Center. In 1990/91 she was probably in her late teens or very early 20s. Anyway, the man I was flirting with, with my vibrant personality, was named Don. He was directing a play that Heather was producing. It was being produced at a place Heather leased, or her father leased, for her to do theatre.

Apparently, Don or Heather found a local playwright, Sherry Goldberg, and were doing her play, GOOD CLEAN FUN. At that party, at some point, Don cast me in the role of “Jessica” without an audition, based on my personality and what I told him about all my theatre history!

I cannot say it was the first time I was cast without an audition . . . but, it certainly would not be the last.

The show went so well. I was blessed and happy when my  beloved high school drama teacher, James Hayden, and Vickie Dinon, came to the show. A few years later, Vickie would pass on after going into insulin coma. And just last September 6th, Jim died from complications of several illnesses. I miss him terribly.

I was much too young to play 30-something Jessica. Despite my real age of 28-years-old, I looked about 20-years-old!

I went back to New York in 1992 and totally in love with GOOD CLEAN FUN. A funny comedy with four women in the lead. I sought a New York producer, found one with the stipulation that I would portray Jessica, again. Of course, I asked Sherry if it was all right to produce her show in her hometown! She said yes . . . 

In 1995/96 GOOD CLEAN FUN went up to some good reviews. Now, I was older, but still too young for Jessica!

Now, finally old enough to portray Jessica; after finding Sherry again (via her daughter, on facebook). I am considering doing the show again.

Today, we had a reading of the very dated play . . . Sherry had sent me the very original script a few weeks ago. I gathered a fabulous cast, too. And we had a read-thru with this great cast:

Helene Galek as “Norma”

Angela Theresa Collins as “Jessica”

Katherine Neville Brown as “Millicent”

Victoria Steele as “Cathleen”

William Kozy as “Frank Summer”

Joe Tom Collins as “Harry Schuller”

Clint Irwin as “Virgil Kensington”

Sherry Zannoth as “Dorothy Shumsky”

Jordan Auslander as “Herman Oyster”

Love, Light & Laughter,

Angela Theresa

http://www.ATCollins.com

 

 

 

 

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